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How to fix a leaning fence

fallen fenceWhile an erect or upright fence provides the desired level of security by preventing entry into restricted space, a leaning fence poses a security and safety hazard represents, looks unattractive and also stands out in the landscape. Fences are typically made of wire and wooden posts that have a tendency to lean or sag with time because of wood decay, strong winds, and movements in the ground or excessive weight. Instead on installing an entirely new fence, you can fix the lean in your fence so it is just as good as new.

You’ll need to begin by clearing the ground around the posts. This will help you get a clear view of what is going on.

The posts are where the leaning is really happening. They may be decayed or snapping apart. Therefore, you might have to reset and repair the concrete.

In case you have to replace the concrete or there is no concrete at all, dig a 6 inch hole around the post. It is more convenient if the hole can be dug on both sides. However, you should not worry in case this cannot be done. You can easily repair the fence from your side.

Step 1

Use a shovel to dig far enough around the fence post until you can push it back upright. Dig the soil deep from the side of the post where it inclines and gather it in small mounds beside each fence post.

Step 2

Use a sledgehammer to drive the 36 inch long stake into the ground until 12 inches are left above the surface of the ground. The stake should be positioned 6 feet from each leaning fence post in the opposite direction to the lean but parallel to the plumb position of the fence. Drive your stakes parallel to each other.

Step 3

Push the fence post upright (in the direction against the lean) until level. Use a level to determine if the post is erect. Hold the level vertically against the fence post.

 Step 4

Get an assistant to hold the post upright while you are extending the 8 foot- long 2 by 4 diagonally from the highest point of the fence post to the parallel stake. Wedge the lower end into the ground so it doesn’t move. Rest the lower end against the stake.

Step 5

Hit a nail through the covert that is in the fence post. Don’t drive the nail completely through as the covert has to be removed after the repair. The covert is a temporary prop that holds the post in position until its fully repaired.

Step 6

Pour concrete into the open area surrounding each leaning fence post until when the concrete is about two inches from the surface. The concrete should cure for at least 24 hours.

Step 7

Ensure that the cement has cured fully before packing soil into the hole around each newly repaired post until it levels with the surrounding soil. Pack it down firmly before removing the 2 by 4 stakes and lumbar.

You can contact us through our website http://www.fencingleeds.org.uk for any further information and help.

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Leeds, LS7 2BB
United Kingdom
Phone: 0113 320 1033
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